Wax Anatomical Model With Pretty Face by Zoe Leonard, 1990
Also

Wax Anatomical Model With Pretty Face by Zoe Leonard, 1990

Also




Pièces anatomiques en cire by Lanith Pierre Petit, 1880 (at Muséum d’histoire naturelle, Paris)

Pièces anatomiques en cire by Lanith Pierre Petit, 1880 (at Muséum d’histoire naturelle, Paris)




Anatomical Venus - La Specola Model, 18th century
From Opening Up a Few Corpses, 1795-1995 by John Bender of Stanford University
Via astropop

Anatomical Venus - La Specola Model, 18th century

From Opening Up a Few Corpses, 1795-1995 by John Bender of Stanford University

Via astropop




frenchtwist:
French female figure modeled in wax This is also the cover illustration for Rachilde’s notorious 1884 novel Monsieur Vénus.

frenchtwist:

French female figure modeled in wax

This is also the cover illustration for Rachilde’s notorious 1884 novel Monsieur Vénus.



Medici Venus (anatomical wax model), 18th century

Medici Venus (anatomical wax model), 18th century




Zoe Leonard, Wax Anatomical Model with Pearls, 1990
"Why photography? Why this medium? Of course there are many uses of photography, artists like Cindy Sherman who essentially document a performance, or photojournalists like Susan Meiselas or Donald McCullum, or fine artists like Penn and Weston. For me photography is intrinsically about observation. It’s about being present in and having a certain perspective on, the world around me. It’s not so much about creating, or my imagination — as drawing, for instance, may be. It’s more about responding. Choosing to look at certain objects or situations. It’s not just what I’m looking at but how I look. Photographs play with the idea of absolute truth. When people look at a photograph, they believe it. We believe that it exposes reality. That a portrait can show someone’s true character. If you see a picture of something, you believe it really happened that way. Pictures are proof. My photographs crawl along that edge. I document the world, but from my own biased point of view. I want to draw the viewer into the process of looking so we can look at these things together. I want to show you what I see. I take pictures of what moves me. Sometimes it’s beauty — the waterfalls, the ocean. Things that fill me with awe. Sometimes it’s gathering evidence, spying on our culture. Things that scare me or disgust me or make me angry. The one part that’s frustrating is if I’m feeling a certain way or want to express certain thoughts, I have to actually find something out in the world that visually conveys that to me, something to take pictures of."
— Zoe Leonard interviewed in Journal of Contemporary Art
(Also)

Zoe Leonard, Wax Anatomical Model with Pearls, 1990

"Why photography? Why this medium? Of course there are many uses of photography, artists like Cindy Sherman who essentially document a performance, or photojournalists like Susan Meiselas or Donald McCullum, or fine artists like Penn and Weston. For me photography is intrinsically about observation. It’s about being present in and having a certain perspective on, the world around me. It’s not so much about creating, or my imagination — as drawing, for instance, may be. It’s more about responding. Choosing to look at certain objects or situations. It’s not just what I’m looking at but how I look. Photographs play with the idea of absolute truth. When people look at a photograph, they believe it. We believe that it exposes reality. That a portrait can show someone’s true character. If you see a picture of something, you believe it really happened that way. Pictures are proof. My photographs crawl along that edge. I document the world, but from my own biased point of view. I want to draw the viewer into the process of looking so we can look at these things together. I want to show you what I see. I take pictures of what moves me. Sometimes it’s beauty — the waterfalls, the ocean. Things that fill me with awe. Sometimes it’s gathering evidence, spying on our culture. Things that scare me or disgust me or make me angry. The one part that’s frustrating is if I’m feeling a certain way or want to express certain thoughts, I have to actually find something out in the world that visually conveys that to me, something to take pictures of."

— Zoe Leonard interviewed in Journal of Contemporary Art

(Also)




The Josephinum : Vienna, Austria
“Anatomical Venus” Wax model with human hair in rosewood and Venetian glass case
Workshop of Clemente Susini of Florence, 1781-1786
(via patentlegs)

The Josephinum : Vienna, Austria

“Anatomical Venus” Wax model with human hair in rosewood and Venetian glass case

Workshop of Clemente Susini of Florence, 1781-1786

(via patentlegs)




billyjane:

 Wax Anatomical Model, partial view from above, 1990
by Zoe Leonard
via dbartmag.de

(Other view)

billyjane:

 Wax Anatomical Model, partial view from above, 1990

by Zoe Leonard

via dbartmag.de

(Other view)




Anatomical Venus, 1782, by Clemente Susini and workshopFrom the Getty Villa’s Color of Life ExhibitionPhoto by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola” Florence, Italy
Via astropop / Morbid Anatomy

Anatomical Venus, 1782, by Clemente Susini and workshop
From the Getty Villa’s Color of Life Exhibition
Photo by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola” Florence, Italy

Via astropop / Morbid Anatomy




defrag:

reblololo:

ratak-monodosico:

Philippe Halsman

defrag:

reblololo:

ratak-monodosico:

Philippe Halsman