“I think where I am not, therefore I am where I do not think … I am not wherever I am the plaything of my thought; I think of what I am where I do not think to think.” — 

Jacques Lacan, “The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious, or Reason Since Freud,” in Écrits: a Selection (trans. Alan Sheridan)

(via heteroglossiajohnshadenumber2)




“I consider myself in my minutiae. I put my finger on the precise point of the fault, the unadmitted slide. For the mind is more reptilian than you yourselves, messieurs, it slips away snakelike, to the point where it damages our language, I mean it leaves it in suspense.
I am the man who has most felt the stupefying confusion of his speech in its relations with thought. I am the man who has most accurately charted the moment of his most intimate, his most imperceptible lapses. I lose myself in my thought, actually, the way one dreams, the way one suddenly slips back into one’s thought. I am the man who knows the inmost recesses of loss.”
— Antonin Artaud, The Nerve Meter


“Language makes thought, as much as it is made by thought. Thought inhabits language and language is its body.” — 

Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Consciousness and the Acquisition of Language, translation by Hugh J. Silverman

(via frenchtwist)




“There is neither a materialization of thought, nor a spiritualization of language; language and thought are only two moments of one and the same reality.” — 

Maurice Merleau-Ponty, The Specter of a Pure Language, translation by John O’Neill

(via frenchtwist)




“Language makes thought, as much as it is made by thought. Thought inhabits language and language is its body.” — 

Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Consciousness and the Acquisition of Language, translation by Hugh J. Silverman

(via frenchtwist)