Ann Slavit’s inflatable vinyl sculpture Della Street, exhibited at Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York City, 1978
Photograph by Elliott Erwitt

Ann Slavit’s inflatable vinyl sculpture Della Street, exhibited at Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York City, 1978

Photograph by Elliott Erwitt




Untitled (Ruth Asawa holding a looped wire sculpture) by Imogen Cunningham, 1952

Untitled (Ruth Asawa holding a looped wire sculpture) by Imogen Cunningham, 1952




arpeggia:

Simon Schubert - Eins, zwei, drei…, 2008

arpeggia:

Simon Schubert - Eins, zwei, drei…, 2008




todf, red-lipstick:

Louise Bourgeois (French-American, 1911-2010) - Maman, 1999  Sculpture: Steel, Marble

todfred-lipstick:

Louise Bourgeois (French-American, 1911-2010) - Maman, 1999  Sculpture: Steel, Marble




frenchtwist:

Tragic Anatomies by Jake and Dinos Chapman, 1996

The Chapmans’ aim is to unearth the contradictions and hypocrisies present in contemporary culture, posing questions but providing no answers.

“There’s nothing we’ve done here that can rival the darkness of the imaginations of children. They aren’t the innocents that adults want them to be.” -J.C.

1. Forehead
2. Mirror, Mirror On The Floor Your Dad’s A Prick Your Mom’s A Whore
3. Catherine Milner

Fibreglass, resin and paint



frenchtwist:
Le genie de l’espece by Wolfgang Paalen, 1938 [T]he surrealist use of bones as material in connection with war and destruction becomes evident in Wolfgang Paalen’s 1938 bone pistol Le Genie de l’Espece, dating from the eve of the Second World War. In this work, chicken bones simulate the shape of the deadly weapon in the moulded trough of a velvet-lined pistol casket. Cause and effect seem to be coalesced in a matrix - the bones, arranged as a fantastic firearm, present death as the deliberate intention and inevitable result of the use of weaponry and are thus meant as an unmistakeable warning of conflict resolution by force. [ftp]

frenchtwist:

Le genie de l’espece by Wolfgang Paalen, 1938

[T]he surrealist use of bones as material in connection with war and destruction becomes evident in Wolfgang Paalen’s 1938 bone pistol Le Genie de l’Espece, dating from the eve of the Second World War. In this work, chicken bones simulate the shape of the deadly weapon in the moulded trough of a velvet-lined pistol casket. Cause and effect seem to be coalesced in a matrix - the bones, arranged as a fantastic firearm, present death as the deliberate intention and inevitable result of the use of weaponry and are thus meant as an unmistakeable warning of conflict resolution by force. [ftp]



sighswhispers:

Penny Slinger with her sculpture ‘Fruit of My Womb’ in Knave magazine, Spring 1973.

sighswhispers:

Penny Slinger with her sculpture ‘Fruit of My Womb’ in Knave magazine, Spring 1973.




minamata, nearlya:

Sophie Calle.  Statues ennemies / Tranché à la hache - 2003, polaroïd

minamatanearlya:

Sophie CalleStatues ennemies / Tranché à la hache - 2003, polaroïd




frenchtwist:

Will o’ the wisp by Kurt Seligmann, 1937

frenchtwist:

Will o’ the wisp by Kurt Seligmann, 1937



thedoppelganger,  vuls:


Anna Karin posing with various polyurethane sculptures in Szapocznikow’s Malakoff studio, Paris, 1968

thedoppelganger vuls:

Anna Karin posing with various polyurethane sculptures in Szapocznikow’s Malakoff studio, Paris, 1968



regardintemporel:

Tim Royce - Le sculpteur Hans Karlewski et plusieurs de ses oeuvres, Londres, ca. 1990

regardintemporel:

Tim Royce - Le sculpteur Hans Karlewski et plusieurs de ses oeuvres, Londres, ca. 1990




generalsurgeon, 2headedsnake:

Elisabet Stienstra
Description of a Struggle

generalsurgeon2headedsnake:

Elisabet Stienstra

Description of a Struggle




 generalsurgeon, olivierbardin:

Nude Women Watch the Eye
The Eye sculpture is by Tony Tasset, photographed in Chicago

 generalsurgeonolivierbardin:

Nude Women Watch the Eye

The Eye sculpture is by Tony Tasset, photographed in Chicago




Maillol, Pomone aux Bras Tombants (Detail) by Bill Brandt
Also

Maillol, Pomone aux Bras Tombants (Detail) by Bill Brandt

Also




frenchtwist:

Sculpture II by Kirsten Justesen, 1969

Sculpture II is very different from my more humorous works dealing with feminist battle issues, even though I also used my own body as a tool. Now my work is very often read as feminist statements. I use my own body since it is at hand. It happens to be a female body. My generation of artists was taught to look at art with a male gaze and we are still fighting that one-dimensional gaze. [ftp]