Kim Novak in publicity still for Bell, Book and Candle (Richard Quine, 1958)

Kim Novak in publicity still for Bell, Book and Candle (Richard Quine, 1958)




Alfred Hitchcock dummy floating in the River Thames for Frenzy trailer, 1972
(via sutured-infection, DILKE)

Alfred Hitchcock dummy floating in the River Thames for Frenzy trailer, 1972

(via sutured-infectionDILKE)




Kim Novak with the cats who played Pyewacket in Bell, Book and Candle, 1958
Photograph by Eliot Elisofon
(via hoodoothatvoodoo)

Kim Novak with the cats who played Pyewacket in Bell, Book and Candle, 1958

Photograph by Eliot Elisofon

(via hoodoothatvoodoo)




billyjane:

Romy Schneider as Carole Werner  in  What’s New Pussycat, 1965
from lumas

billyjane:

Romy Schneider as Carole Werner  in  What’s New Pussycat, 1965

from lumas




Charlotte Rampling in publicity still for The Night Porter (Liliana Cavani, 1975)

Charlotte Rampling in publicity still for The Night Porter (Liliana Cavani, 1975)




oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Orson Welles in publicity still for The Lady From Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles)
 
Q. What was the Hollywood reaction generally to [The Lady From Shanghai]?
Welles: Friends avoided me. Whenever it was mentioned, people would clear their throats and change the subject very quickly out of consideration for my feelings. I only found out that it was considered a good picture when I got to Europe. The first nice thing I ever heard about it from an American was from Truman Capote. One night in Sicily, he quoted whole pages of dialogue word for word.
Q. I guess that’s called being ahead of your time.
Welles: It’s called being in trouble.
-excerpted from This Is Orson Welles

oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Orson Welles in publicity still for The Lady From Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles)

Q. What was the Hollywood reaction generally to [The Lady From Shanghai]?

Welles: Friends avoided me. Whenever it was mentioned, people would clear their throats and change the subject very quickly out of consideration for my feelings. I only found out that it was considered a good picture when I got to Europe. The first nice thing I ever heard about it from an American was from Truman Capote. One night in Sicily, he quoted whole pages of dialogue word for word.

Q. I guess that’s called being ahead of your time.

Welles: It’s called being in trouble.

-excerpted from This Is Orson Welles




Charlotte Rampling and Dirk Bogarde in pubicity still for The Night Porter (Liliana Cavani, 1975)
Via L’aquoiboniste

Charlotte Rampling and Dirk Bogarde in pubicity still for The Night Porter (Liliana Cavani, 1975)

Via L’aquoiboniste




oldhollywood:

“The body of a rotund man floating along the Thames looked familiar, the face and the portly figure recognisable from the movies.
But nothing nasty had happened to Alfred Hitchcock. The East End-born  son of a London greengrocer was merely exercising his macabre sense of  humour and marketing skills.
The director was announcing his return home to make Frenzy, a  typically gruesome thriller and the first film he’d made entirely in his  home country for more than 20 years.
Floating a lifelike dummy of himself on the river was the type of  gimmick, mischievous and macabre, that he loved. In a business where  those in front of the cameras expect to be the stars, Hitchcock proved bigger than his movies.”
(via)

oldhollywood:

“The body of a rotund man floating along the Thames looked familiar, the face and the portly figure recognisable from the movies.

But nothing nasty had happened to Alfred Hitchcock. The East End-born son of a London greengrocer was merely exercising his macabre sense of humour and marketing skills.

The director was announcing his return home to make Frenzy, a typically gruesome thriller and the first film he’d made entirely in his home country for more than 20 years.

Floating a lifelike dummy of himself on the river was the type of gimmick, mischievous and macabre, that he loved. In a business where those in front of the cameras expect to be the stars, Hitchcock proved bigger than his movies.”

(via)




Kim Novak in publicity still for Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
Via Verdoux

Kim Novak in publicity still for Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

Via Verdoux




unbearablevision:

Mia Kirshner in publicity still for Love and Human Remains (Denys Arcand, 1993)
Yes, have to cut down on these. How can high-waisted PVC leggings be so deeply wrong on pseudo-hussying Olivia Newton John and so deeply saucy on Mia-as-psychic-dominatrix?

Such a dilemma, even, that I’m compelled to reblog myself. Er.

unbearablevision:

Mia Kirshner in publicity still for Love and Human Remains (Denys Arcand, 1993)

Yes, have to cut down on these. How can high-waisted PVC leggings be so deeply wrong on pseudo-hussying Olivia Newton John and so deeply saucy on Mia-as-psychic-dominatrix?

Such a dilemma, even, that I’m compelled to reblog myself. Er.




unbearablevision:

Mia Kirshner in publicity still for Love and Human Remains (Denys Arcand, 1993)

unbearablevision:

Mia Kirshner in publicity still for Love and Human Remains (Denys Arcand, 1993)