minamata:

Rasa Todosijevic, Was ist Kunst 1978 B&W C-type photograph 35x25cm

minamata:

Rasa Todosijevic, Was ist Kunst 1978 B&W C-type photograph 35x25cm




Aktion Sorgenkind, Wien by Gottfried Helnwein, 1972




199714424, performance-sofa:

claudia casarino —  sin titulo, 1998

performance-sofa:

claudia casarino —  sin titulo, 1998




insideflesh:

blackout (I)

insideflesh:

blackout (I)




thedoppelganger, gallowhill:

Tunga, Xifópagas Capilares, 1984

thedoppelgangergallowhill:

Tunga, Xifópagas Capilares, 1984




Showroomdummies by Gisèle Vienne and Etienne Bideau-Rey 
Photography by Mathilde Darel




Still from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974
Also

Still from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974

Also




minamata, gallowhill:

Ewa Partum - Tautological Cinema, 1973

minamatagallowhill:

Ewa Partum - Tautological Cinema, 1973




Stills from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974

Watch here

Also

Tautological Cinema is a series of short films made in the paradigm of structural cinema – the movement of the late 1960s which focused on the examination of material factors of a film. Looking into a film as a medium Ewa Patrum concentrates on the notion of automatisation of a film message and the structure of its language. “It’s not dealing with aesthetics” claims the author. “It’s rather a new sort of philosophical practice that operates in the area in which the relation between the film image and the camerawork covers the whole interest in the film itself”. In artistic practice, such ideas can, for instance, take a form of an analysis of how film tape makes its way through a projector, as in the film 10 Metres of Film Tape. A work which stands out is Film by Ewa, which examines different ways of artistic communication and states that the indirect passing of ideas is not possible. “Covering, in turn, her mouth, eyes, ears (meant to manifest that an idea within an artist is not transferable) Ewa Patrum formulates an opinion which is to show the alienation of an author who, creating the art of meaning, cannot fully express the intentional idea. Once it gets materialized against an art medium or gets into the area of someone else’s experience it is distorted and distanced from the original meaning” argues Łukasz Ronduda.




regardintemporel:

Andy Warhol - En attendant la performance ” Pork “, 2 Août 1971 

regardintemporel:

Andy Warhol - En attendant la performance ” Pork “, 2 Août 1971 




Aktion Sommer by Rudolf Schwarzkogler1965

Also




From the Doll Reconstruction Project by SUKA OFF (Homage to Hans Bellmer)

"And didn’t the doll, which lived solely through the thoughts projected into it, and which despite its unlimited pliancy could be maddeningly stand-offish, didn’t the very creation of its dollishness contain the desire and intensity sought in it by the imagination? Didn’t it amount to the final triumph over those young girls – with their wide eyes and averted looks – when a conscious gaze plundered its charms, when aggressive fingers searching for something malleable allowed the distillates of mind and senses slowly to take form, limb by limb?

Fit one joint to the other, swivel the ball-joints full circle and test them for childlike poses, gently trace the hollows, savour the pleasures of the curves, stray into the opening of an ear, do pretty things while simultaneously scattering the salt of deformation with a hint of vengeance. 

[…]

Isn’t that the solution?”

— Hans Bellmer, The Doll

Also




From the Doll Reconstruction Project by SUKA OFF 

Stills from a performance for camera, inspired by the photographs of Unica Zürn taken by Hans Bellmer

"The disruption of body parts has an important function for Bellmer. He is fascinated by the ‘bubbles’ of flesh that are created and the inability of the mind to understand what it sees. For Bellmer ‘the imagination derives exclusively from bodily experiences’ and language is hardly sufficient to describe ‘the interoceptive images of the body’. It is the places where the viscera intercept with desired excitation that he is interested in unveiling. These could be any point of focus where desire is submitted to by an internal impulse leaving the rest of the body to disappear or be displaced.”

— Miranda Argyle, Hans Bellmer and The Games of the Doll




My Grandmother’s Gestures by Nancy Wilson-Pajic, 1972–1973
"When I was young, my mother frequently reprimanded me for touching my face. My hands, which were usually dirty, were constantly in the vicinity of my mouth and I was in danger of ruining my complexion. No one could understand why I did this. Recently, I realized that the gestures were identical to those of my grandmother who had survived a delicate nerve operation which had numbed one side of her face. She was especially self-conscious about the side of her mouth, where she imagined saliva or food might escape undetected."
"My grandmother’s appearance and manner revealed little more than a composed, well-bred, ordinary woman, but hints of a wild, uncontrollable, independent nature could be perceived in the stories she told me in confidence and from her biting wit. As a child I greatly admired this ability of hers to fit into a role and her surroundings without compromising an extraordinary will. It seemed to me that it was this ability to mask her passion behind severity and propriety that freed her from the pressure to conform that seemed always focused on me. The training she gave me, largely by example, was less about how to be than about how to behave in order to survive."
(via thedoppelganger, crematorie)

My Grandmother’s Gestures by Nancy Wilson-Pajic, 1972–1973

"When I was young, my mother frequently reprimanded me for touching my face. My hands, which were usually dirty, were constantly in the vicinity of my mouth and I was in danger of ruining my complexion. No one could understand why I did this. Recently, I realized that the gestures were identical to those of my grandmother who had survived a delicate nerve operation which had numbed one side of her face. She was especially self-conscious about the side of her mouth, where she imagined saliva or food might escape undetected."

"My grandmother’s appearance and manner revealed little more than a composed, well-bred, ordinary woman, but hints of a wild, uncontrollable, independent nature could be perceived in the stories she told me in confidence and from her biting wit. As a child I greatly admired this ability of hers to fit into a role and her surroundings without compromising an extraordinary will. It seemed to me that it was this ability to mask her passion behind severity and propriety that freed her from the pressure to conform that seemed always focused on me. The training she gave me, largely by example, was less about how to be than about how to behave in order to survive."

(via thedoppelgangercrematorie)




regardintemporel:

Teresa Tyszkiewicz - Cottonwool, 1980

regardintemporel:

Teresa Tyszkiewicz - Cottonwool, 1980