billyjane:

a_k: Gustave Geley. Materialization of a Woman’s Face Produced by the Medium Eva C.

billyjane:

a_k: Gustave Geley. Materialization of a Woman’s Face Produced by the Medium Eva C.




someghostsarewomen:

Anonymous, “The medium Ferihummer with a materialization”, 1923

someghostsarewomen:

Anonymous, “The medium Ferihummer with a materialization”, 1923




someghostsarewomen:

Albert von Schrenck-Notzing, “The medium Stanislawa P: emission and resorption of an ectoplasmic substance through the mouth”, 25 January 1913

someghostsarewomen:

Albert von Schrenck-Notzing, “The medium Stanislawa P: emission and resorption of an ectoplasmic substance through the mouth”, 25 January 1913




Medium Florence Cook in trance being looked over by a spirit  
Photograph by Frederick Hudson, 1874
Via Gargantuan Sound

Medium Florence Cook in trance being looked over by a spirit  

Photograph by Frederick Hudson, 1874

Via Gargantuan Sound




Medium exuding ectoplasm; photographer unknown
Via Necropolis Now

Medium exuding ectoplasm; photographer unknown

Via Necropolis Now




Anonymous, “Partial dematerialization of the medium Marguerite Beuttinger”, 1920
Via Dieselpunks

Anonymous, “Partial dematerialization of the medium Marguerite Beuttinger”, 1920

Via Dieselpunks




Medium exuding ectoplasm by Ada Deane, 1922
"Ectoplasm is shapeless, it is "informe," a kind of primordial paste—and to show itself as this, it annexes semiotic markers that designate  intermediate spirit worlds. When looking at these fluid, inchoate forms, sometimes imprinted with a face, it is worth recalling that the word larva, used in English for the early stage of a caterpillar, meant “ghost” or  “specter” in Latin, but is also used by Horace to designate a mask, such as might frighten an observer, while the verb larvo meant “to  bewitch” or “enchant.” Ectoplasmic masks are indeed larval: they promise  the emergence of forms, but don’t deliver them. The term pseudopod catches this relationship with the embryonic—and indeed with abortion.”
— Marina Warner, ‘Ethereal Body: The Quest for Ectoplasm’, Cabinet, Issue 12, Fall/Winter 2003
(Image via Necropolis Now)

Medium exuding ectoplasm by Ada Deane, 1922

"Ectoplasm is shapeless, it is "informe," a kind of primordial paste—and to show itself as this, it annexes semiotic markers that designate intermediate spirit worlds. When looking at these fluid, inchoate forms, sometimes imprinted with a face, it is worth recalling that the word larva, used in English for the early stage of a caterpillar, meant “ghost” or “specter” in Latin, but is also used by Horace to designate a mask, such as might frighten an observer, while the verb larvo meant “to bewitch” or “enchant.” Ectoplasmic masks are indeed larval: they promise the emergence of forms, but don’t deliver them. The term pseudopod catches this relationship with the embryonic—and indeed with abortion.”

Marina Warner, ‘Ethereal Body: The Quest for Ectoplasm’, Cabinet, Issue 12, Fall/Winter 2003

(Image via Necropolis Now)




my-ear-trumpet:

phantasma:

Photo of a Spirit Medium with Ectoplasm (1913) - Dieselpunks

my-ear-trumpet:

phantasma:

Photo of a Spirit Medium with Ectoplasm (1913) - Dieselpunks




Photograph of the Welsh medium Joe Thomas, taken in about 1920 by medium William Hope. The shrouded woman’s face appearing in the photograph was not identified by Thomas, but it may indicate some form of collaboration between him and Hope.
From Collection of National Media Museum

Photograph of the Welsh medium Joe Thomas, taken in about 1920 by medium William Hope. The shrouded woman’s face appearing in the photograph was not identified by Thomas, but it may indicate some form of collaboration between him and Hope.

From Collection of National Media Museum




Manifestation of a female figure produced by the medium Linda Gazzera
(via garconniere, rapeblossom)

Manifestation of a female figure produced by the medium Linda Gazzera

(via garconniererapeblossom)