ratak-monodosico:

Original caption: “Illustrating important anterior (and posterior) areas for sedative, stimulating, tonic, counter-irritant and other local applications to influence the internal organs and tissues marked in outline.”

High Frequency Electric Currents in Medicine and Dentistry. S.H. Monell. 1910.




Operation des Schielens (Surgery for Squint) by Herbert List, 1944-1946
(via rrosehobart)

Operation des Schielens (Surgery for Squint) by Herbert List, 1944-1946

(via rrosehobart)




foxesinbreeches:

This manipulated photo shows the effects of sunlight on the health of the body.
Fritz Kahn, Zurich-Leipzig, 1939
From Der Mensch gesund und krank, Menschenkunde (Man in Structure and Function), Vol. 2, 1940
Via Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medical Exhibit

foxesinbreeches:

This manipulated photo shows the effects of sunlight on the health of the body.

Fritz Kahn, Zurich-Leipzig, 1939

From Der Mensch gesund und krank, Menschenkunde (Man in Structure and Function), Vol. 2, 1940

Via Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medical Exhibit




sutured-infection:


Deformity apparatus: Chas. F. Stillman’s long bow-leg braces. 1893 medical supply catalogue.

sutured-infection:

Deformity apparatus: Chas. F. Stillman’s long bow-leg braces. 1893 medical supply catalogue.




elettrogenica, cosmosonic:





Dr. Flaxlander’s pneumatic hip-shaper 1929

elettrogenicacosmosonic:

Dr. Flaxlander’s pneumatic hip-shaper 1929




From Manuel Pratique d’hypnotisme, 1941
Via Au carrefour étrange 

From Manuel Pratique d’hypnotisme, 1941

Via Au carrefour étrange 




A photograph of Augustine Gleizes from Medical Muses: Hysteria in Nineteenth-Century Paris by Asti Hustvedt

Through hypnosis, Jean-Martin Charcot sparked off different states in his patients like catalepsy, lethargy or somnambulism, up to cause artificial spasms by rubbing flexors. This photography shows his patient, Augustine, in a state of lethargy. The back muscles and those of the thighs and legs are contracted by friction; the rigid body placed between two chairs was holding the pose for several minutes.

A photograph of Augustine Gleizes from Medical Muses: Hysteria in Nineteenth-Century Paris by Asti Hustvedt

Through hypnosis, Jean-Martin Charcot sparked off different states in his patients like catalepsy, lethargy or somnambulism, up to cause artificial spasms by rubbing flexors. This photography shows his patient, Augustine, in a state of lethargy. The back muscles and those of the thighs and legs are contracted by friction; the rigid body placed between two chairs was holding the pose for several minutes.




Photographic illustration of skin disease taken from the case studies and notes of American dermatologist George Henry Fox
Photograph most likely taken by OG Mason
Via Memento Mori

Photographic illustration of skin disease taken from the case studies and notes of American dermatologist George Henry Fox

Photograph most likely taken by OG Mason

Via Memento Mori




Anatomy of a Woman’s Spine by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty, 1746

Anatomy of a Woman’s Spine by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty, 1746




kirgiakos, hearts-are-needles:

Hip Splint, c.1933.

kirgiakoshearts-are-needles:

Hip Splint, c.1933.




todf, sheshallbleed:

9th:
[“water massages as a treatment for ‘hysteria’ (c. 1860)”]

todfsheshallbleed:

9th:

[“water massages as a treatment for ‘hysteria’ (c. 1860)”]




Anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini and workshop, 1782 (from the Getty Villa’s Color of Life exhibition)
Photograph by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola,” Florence, Italy

Anatomical Venuses are life-sized wax anatomical models of idealized women, extremely realistic in appearance and often adorned with real hair and ornamental jewelry. These figures consist of removable parts that can be “dissected” to demonstrate anatomy— a breast plate is lifted to reveal the inner workings of the mysterious female body, often with a fetus to be found nestling in the womb. […] This was a way to share anatomical discovery with a larger audience without the need for an actual human dissection.Anatomical Venuses are probably the most historically popular form of anatomical models; in the 19th-Century, they were the centerpiece of museums and itinerant shows of all kinds, and possessed great power to draw crowds. The 18th-Century Florentine Venuses are the best remembered today, in no small part due to Taschen’s Encyclopaedia Anatomica, and are considered, by some, to be the finest examples of Anatomical Venuses known to exist.

Via Morbid Anatomy
Also

Anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini and workshop, 1782 (from the Getty Villa’s Color of Life exhibition)

Photograph by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola,” Florence, Italy

Anatomical Venuses are life-sized wax anatomical models of idealized women, extremely realistic in appearance and often adorned with real hair and ornamental jewelry. These figures consist of removable parts that can be “dissected” to demonstrate anatomy— a breast plate is lifted to reveal the inner workings of the mysterious female body, often with a fetus to be found nestling in the womb. […] This was a way to share anatomical discovery with a larger audience without the need for an actual human dissection.

Anatomical Venuses are probably the most historically popular form of anatomical models; in the 19th-Century, they were the centerpiece of museums and itinerant shows of all kinds, and possessed great power to draw crowds. The 18th-Century Florentine Venuses are the best remembered today, in no small part due to Taschen’s Encyclopaedia Anatomica, and are considered, by some, to be the finest examples of Anatomical Venuses known to exist.

Via Morbid Anatomy

Also




frenchtwist:
The carotid, subclavian, and axillary arteries From Quain’s Elements of Anatomy by Jones Quain and Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Schäfer, 1892Also

frenchtwist:

The carotid, subclavian, and axillary arteries

From Quain’s Elements of Anatomy by Jones Quain and Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Schäfer, 1892

Also



frenchtwist:

Illustration of rabbit skull from A Systeme of Anatomy (treating of the body of man, beasts, birds, fish, insects, and plants) by Samuel Collins, 1685

Also



sutured-infection:

Jonas Arnold Delineavit - Amputation Instruments, from Johannes Scultetus’s Armamentarium chirurgicum bipartitum, 1666

sutured-infection:

Jonas Arnold Delineavit - Amputation Instruments, from Johannes Scultetus’s Armamentarium chirurgicum bipartitum, 1666