Collage by Max Ernst for The House of Fear, Notes From Down Below by Leonora Carrington, 1988
Also [+]

Collage by Max Ernst for The House of Fear, Notes From Down Below by Leonora Carrington, 1988

Also [+]




batarde:

Max Ernst. Illustration to “A Week of Kindness”, 1934, collage on paper. Surrealism. (via artmagnifique)

batarde:

Max Ernst. Illustration to “A Week of Kindness”, 1934, collage on paper. Surrealism. (via artmagnifique)




kirgiakos:

Max Ernst - Une Semaine de Bonté [Dimanche] (c.1934)
collage / illustration

kirgiakos:

Max Ernst Une Semaine de Bonté [Dimanche] (c.1934)

collage / illustration




batarde:


Max Ernst - from ‘Une semaine de bonté’, (1934) (via indypendent-thinking)

batarde:

Max Ernst - from ‘Une semaine de bonté’, (1934) (via indypendent-thinking)




L’immaculée conception / Alors je vous présenterai l’oncle from La femme 100 têtes by Max Ernst, 1929




“Nothing can stop the passing smile which accompanies the crimes from one sex to the other, the unlimited meetings and robust effervescences in the supposedly poisoned wheel, and public discharges at any place (all places equal). And Loplop, the best bird, made himself fleshless flesh to live amongst us. His smile will be elegantly sober. His arm will be drunkness, his sting fire. His look will descend straight into the debris of the parched cities.” — Max Ernst, La femme 100 têtes


“Living alone on her phantom-globe, beautiful garbed in her dreams, Perturbation, my sister, the 100-headless woman. Every bloody revolt will make her live endowed with grace and truth. Her smile, the fire, will fall like black jelly and white rust on the flanks of the mountain, and her phantom-globe will find us at every halting place.” —  Max Ernst, La femme 100 têtes


“The night howls in its hiding-place and approaches our eyes like wounded flesh.
A door opens itself backwards by the night of silence. A bodiless body places himself parallel to his body and shows us - like a phantomless phantom with particular saliva - the matrix for postage stamps. Two bodiless bodies place themselves parallel to their bodies, falling out of beds and curtains - like phantomless phantoms.”
— Max Ernst, La femme 100 têtes


regardintemporel:



Max Ernst - From ” La femme 100 têtes “, 1929

regardintemporel:

Max Ernst - From ” La femme 100 têtes “, 1929




kirgiakos:

Collages by Max Ernst for “The House of Fear, Notes from Down Below”  by Leonora Carrington, published in 1988

kirgiakos:

Collages by Max Ernst for “The House of Fear, Notes from Down Below”  by Leonora Carrington, published in 1988




Loplop et la Belle Jardinière by Max Ernst, 1929

Loplop et la Belle Jardinière by Max Ernst, 1929




Se nourrissant de rêves liquides et tout à fait semblables à des feuilles by Max Ernst, 1929

Se nourrissant de rêves liquides et tout à fait semblables à des feuilles by Max Ernst, 1929




La femme 100 têtes (Eric Duvivier, 1968)


Adaptation of Max Ernst’s 1929 book of collages 

Watch here
I try not to (gratuitously) re-blog myself (contrary to manic repetition thereof today), but these are too good. See more at eugenehl’s.
(via unbearable vision, eugenehl) 

La femme 100 têtes (Eric Duvivier, 1968)

Adaptation of Max Ernst’s 1929 book of collages 

Watch here

I try not to (gratuitously) re-blog myself (contrary to manic repetition thereof today), but these are too good. See more at eugenehl’s.

(via unbearable visioneugenehl




Marlene by Max Ernst, 1941

Marlene by Max Ernst, 1941




regardintemporel:

Max Ernst - Illustration pour Les Malheurs des Immortels révélés par Paul Eluard et Max Ernst, 1922

regardintemporel:

Max Ernst - Illustration pour Les Malheurs des Immortels révélés par Paul Eluard et Max Ernst, 1922