Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)




Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)
(via fuckyeahkenrussell, feedtheflies)

Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

(via fuckyeahkenrussellfeedtheflies)




unbearablevision:

The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)
(via minamata, catito)

unbearablevision:

The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

(via minamata, catito)




The Debussy Film (Ken Russell, 1958)
(via throwherinthewater)

The Debussy Film (Ken Russell, 1958)

(via throwherinthewater)




unbearablevision, fuckyeahkenrussell:

Marisa Mell in French Dressing (Ken Russell, 1964)

unbearablevision, fuckyeahkenrussell:

Marisa Mell in French Dressing (Ken Russell, 1964)




throwherinthewater:

ultrapeanut:

I love you Uncle Ken.

i was informed last night that he was ON CELEBRITY BIG BROTHER UK. and he left, but offered to come back WITH FAYE DUNAWAY. who says no to that (the producers of big brother, apparently)

Oh, bless you, knob-faced Uncle Ken. I received a frantic phone-call a couple of years back from a Russellmanic friend (so Russellmanic he tolerates The Music Lovers and even Whore - not to be confused with the nunsploitation expert), who told me to get myself to the TV stat because Ken was omigod on Big Brother UK, great big ho that he is, and what jolly good fun that was, and the sodding machine chose that very moment to break.
Ken Russell broke my television.  
…Maybe it’s the phallic nose thing that drove me to this especially ridiculous tangent, and I haven’t even had my first coffee of the the day yet, but now I have this demented tableau traversing through my sleep-deprived head in which Ken and Faye Dunaway re-enact the “She’s my sister! And my daughter! Sister! Daughter! Sister! Daughter!” face-slapping Oedipal antics of Chinatown, with nuns frotting crucifixes blamelessly in the background.

throwherinthewater:

ultrapeanut:

I love you Uncle Ken.

i was informed last night that he was ON CELEBRITY BIG BROTHER UK. and he left, but offered to come back WITH FAYE DUNAWAY. who says no to that (the producers of big brother, apparently)

Oh, bless you, knob-faced Uncle Ken. I received a frantic phone-call a couple of years back from a Russellmanic friend (so Russellmanic he tolerates The Music Lovers and even Whore - not to be confused with the nunsploitation expert), who told me to get myself to the TV stat because Ken was omigod on Big Brother UK, great big ho that he is, and what jolly good fun that was, and the sodding machine chose that very moment to break.

Ken Russell broke my television.  

…Maybe it’s the phallic nose thing that drove me to this especially ridiculous tangent, and I haven’t even had my first coffee of the the day yet, but now I have this demented tableau traversing through my sleep-deprived head in which Ken and Faye Dunaway re-enact the “She’s my sister! And my daughter! Sister! Daughter! Sister! Daughter!” face-slapping Oedipal antics of Chinatown, with nuns frotting crucifixes blamelessly in the background.




unbearablevision:

The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)
“Shot at Pinewood on awe-inspiringly pristine sets designed by  fledgling                artist Derek Jarman to evoke Huxley’s image of “a rape in a                 public toilet”, The Devils was a controversial project  from                the outset. Initially written for United Artists, for whom  Russell                had already directed three successful movies (Billion  Dollar Brain,                1967; Women in Love, 1969; The Music Lovers, 1970), The  Devils was                promptly dropped when “somebody at UA actually read the  script”                and was subsequently picked up by a rival studio. Even  before shooting                was complete, salacious stories began to appear in the  British press                of naked nuns being sexually assaulted by drunken extras  during                the filming of the demonic orgy scenes, and of underage  performers                being present during the rehearsals for a scene involving  nudity.                Lengthy negotiations with the British censors resulted  finally in                the granting of an ‘X’ certificate, which was promptly  overturned                by many local councils (which simply banned the film  outright) and                vociferously opposed by Festival of Light spokesman Peter  Thompson,                who called for the certificate to be withdrawn and for new  chief                censor Stephen Murphy to resign. Meanwhile, the howl of  critical                outrage that greeted the film’s release in the summer of  1971 came                to a head when an apoplectic Russell physically attacked  Evening                Standard writer Alexander Walker live on national  television, striking                him about the head with a copy of his own review in a  confrontation                that has gone down in the annals of British television  history.
But for all the public agitation The Devils provoked, it  has only                ever been seen in versions which dilute the unfettered  excesses                of Russell’s intentionally ferocious vision and which  temper the                on-screen extremities the director had worked such magic  to conjure.                Twice butchered in America by its own distributors (for  both ‘X’-                and later ‘R’-rated US releases), the most complete  version remains                the British ‘X’-rated edition which BBFC records log as  having been                trimmed by 89 seconds prior to the film’s UK release. Yet  my own                investigations have revealed that somewhere between four  and five                minutes of footage which Russell intended for inclusion  was slashed                from The Devils prior to BBFC submission, consigning  entire sequences                to the cutting-room floor, most notoriously the orgiastic  centrepiece                that has become known as the holy grail of Russell’s black  mass:                the ‘rape of Christ’.
In Russell’s original vision this sequence was to be both the thematic                and visual climax of The Devils, bringing the various  threads of                political, religious and sexual corruption together in a  scene of                spectacular perversion. In the original assembly this  sequence immediately                followed an act of deception by the king, who visits the  carousing                nuns of Loudun in disguise to see for himself the  “miracle”                of their alleged demonic possession. Handing Father Barre a  holy                relic which he claims to be a phial of Christ’s own blood,  the king                watches in amusement as his gift swiftly drives the demons  from                the gibbering nuns before being revealed to be nothing but  an empty                box. Spurred to new heights of hysteria, the nuns batter  Father                Barre to the floor and unclothe a priest before charging  the altar                where hangs a vast statue of an anguished Christ. Tearing  down the                crucifix and laying it on the floor, the nuns proceed to  engage                in a maniacal ravaging of the statue, watched from on high  by a                masturbating Father Mignon whose breathless exertions are  matched                by a series of eye-popping crash-zooms from an overhead  view of                the blasphemous orgy.”
(via BFI)

unbearablevision:

The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

“Shot at Pinewood on awe-inspiringly pristine sets designed by fledgling artist Derek Jarman to evoke Huxley’s image of “a rape in a public toilet”, The Devils was a controversial project from the outset. Initially written for United Artists, for whom Russell had already directed three successful movies (Billion Dollar Brain, 1967; Women in Love, 1969; The Music Lovers, 1970), The Devils was promptly dropped when “somebody at UA actually read the script” and was subsequently picked up by a rival studio. Even before shooting was complete, salacious stories began to appear in the British press of naked nuns being sexually assaulted by drunken extras during the filming of the demonic orgy scenes, and of underage performers being present during the rehearsals for a scene involving nudity. Lengthy negotiations with the British censors resulted finally in the granting of an ‘X’ certificate, which was promptly overturned by many local councils (which simply banned the film outright) and vociferously opposed by Festival of Light spokesman Peter Thompson, who called for the certificate to be withdrawn and for new chief censor Stephen Murphy to resign. Meanwhile, the howl of critical outrage that greeted the film’s release in the summer of 1971 came to a head when an apoplectic Russell physically attacked Evening Standard writer Alexander Walker live on national television, striking him about the head with a copy of his own review in a confrontation that has gone down in the annals of British television history.

But for all the public agitation The Devils provoked, it has only ever been seen in versions which dilute the unfettered excesses of Russell’s intentionally ferocious vision and which temper the on-screen extremities the director had worked such magic to conjure. Twice butchered in America by its own distributors (for both ‘X’- and later ‘R’-rated US releases), the most complete version remains the British ‘X’-rated edition which BBFC records log as having been trimmed by 89 seconds prior to the film’s UK release. Yet my own investigations have revealed that somewhere between four and five minutes of footage which Russell intended for inclusion was slashed from The Devils prior to BBFC submission, consigning entire sequences to the cutting-room floor, most notoriously the orgiastic centrepiece that has become known as the holy grail of Russell’s black mass: the ‘rape of Christ’.

In Russell’s original vision this sequence was to be both the thematic and visual climax of The Devils, bringing the various threads of political, religious and sexual corruption together in a scene of spectacular perversion. In the original assembly this sequence immediately followed an act of deception by the king, who visits the carousing nuns of Loudun in disguise to see for himself the “miracle” of their alleged demonic possession. Handing Father Barre a holy relic which he claims to be a phial of Christ’s own blood, the king watches in amusement as his gift swiftly drives the demons from the gibbering nuns before being revealed to be nothing but an empty box. Spurred to new heights of hysteria, the nuns batter Father Barre to the floor and unclothe a priest before charging the altar where hangs a vast statue of an anguished Christ. Tearing down the crucifix and laying it on the floor, the nuns proceed to engage in a maniacal ravaging of the statue, watched from on high by a masturbating Father Mignon whose breathless exertions are matched by a series of eye-popping crash-zooms from an overhead view of the blasphemous orgy.”

(via BFI)




cendrars:

throwherinthewater:

ultrapeanut:

Now that’s a mustache.


mmmm Oliver

Every film really would improve upon the combination of Ollie (may he rest in gin-pickledness) and nuns.

cendrars:

throwherinthewater:

ultrapeanut:

Now that’s a mustache.

mmmm Oliver

Every film really would improve upon the combination of Ollie (may he rest in gin-pickledness) and nuns.




Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)
(via Poletti)

Vanessa Redgrave in The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

(via Poletti)




Tommy (Ken Russell, 1975)
(via Père Ubu)

Tommy (Ken Russell, 1975)

(via Père Ubu)




Heinz jacuzzi: A Heinzy Ann-Margret in Tommy (Ken Russell, 1975)

Heinz jacuzzi: A Heinzy Ann-Margret in Tommy (Ken Russell, 1975)