frenchtwist:

Tragic Anatomies by Jake and Dinos Chapman, 1996

The Chapmans’ aim is to unearth the contradictions and hypocrisies present in contemporary culture, posing questions but providing no answers.

“There’s nothing we’ve done here that can rival the darkness of the imaginations of children. They aren’t the innocents that adults want them to be.” -J.C.

1. Forehead
2. Mirror, Mirror On The Floor Your Dad’s A Prick Your Mom’s A Whore
3. Catherine Milner

Fibreglass, resin and paint



Jake and Dinos Chapman, Great Deeds Against the Dead, 1994, mixed media with plinth

Jake and Dinos Chapman, Great Deeds Against the Dead, 1994, mixed media with plinth




Jake and Dinos Chapman, Zygotic acceleration, biogenetic, de-sublimated libidinal model, 1995
From Tate Liverpool, with reference to former exhibit, ‘Jake and Dinos Chapman: Bad Art For Bad People’ (15 December 2006 - 4 March 2007):


The series of mutated mannequin sculptures, or anatomies, shown here dominate the artists’ work of the 1990s. Zygotic acceleration biogenetic de-subliminated libidinal model (enlarged x 1000) 1995 is composed of a group of child mannequins fused together, whose misplaced genitals replace other orifices. Such works evoke the Surrealists’ fascination with shop-display mannequins, waxworks, automatons or dolls, relating them also to Sigmund Freud’s (1856-1939) concept of the uncanny, because they hover between the living and the inanimate. The Chapmans’ mannequins only become truly uncanny when, like Hans Bellmer’s dolls, the artists play with their bodily coherence, fragmenting and fusing bodies together to create monstrous hybrids, displacing usually concealed or hidden parts of the human body (genitalia, pudenda) onto their faces. They also refer to a Freudian view of displaced sexual desire or libido, or desires that are repressed and then released (de-sublimated), as in The Return of the Repressed 1997. Furthermore, they evoke contemporary concerns with genetic manipulation and cloning - or ‘Frankenstein science’ - and vanity or celebrity driven plastic surgery.

Jake and Dinos Chapman, Zygotic acceleration, biogenetic, de-sublimated libidinal model, 1995

From Tate Liverpool, with reference to former exhibit, ‘Jake and Dinos Chapman: Bad Art For Bad People’ (15 December 2006 - 4 March 2007):

The series of mutated mannequin sculptures, or anatomies, shown here dominate the artists’ work of the 1990s. Zygotic acceleration biogenetic de-subliminated libidinal model (enlarged x 1000) 1995 is composed of a group of child mannequins fused together, whose misplaced genitals replace other orifices. Such works evoke the Surrealists’ fascination with shop-display mannequins, waxworks, automatons or dolls, relating them also to Sigmund Freud’s (1856-1939) concept of the uncanny, because they hover between the living and the inanimate. The Chapmans’ mannequins only become truly uncanny when, like Hans Bellmer’s dolls, the artists play with their bodily coherence, fragmenting and fusing bodies together to create monstrous hybrids, displacing usually concealed or hidden parts of the human body (genitalia, pudenda) onto their faces. They also refer to a Freudian view of displaced sexual desire or libido, or desires that are repressed and then released (de-sublimated), as in The Return of the Repressed 1997. Furthermore, they evoke contemporary concerns with genetic manipulation and cloning - or ‘Frankenstein science’ - and vanity or celebrity driven plastic surgery.