Self-Portrait of You + Me (Jayne Mansfield) by Douglas Gordon, 2007
Poster for Crash in conjunction with Crash: Homage to JG Ballard at Gagosian Gallery, London 
(via kirgiakos, nevver)

Self-Portrait of You + Me (Jayne Mansfield) by Douglas Gordon, 2007

Poster for Crash in conjunction with Crash: Homage to JG Ballard at Gagosian Gallery, London 

(via kirgiakosnevver)




“She sat in the damaged car like a deity occupying a shrine readied for her in the blood of a minor member of her congregation.” — 

J.G. Ballard, Crash

(via todf)




“Vaughan unfolded for me all his obsessions with the mysterious eroticism of wounds, the perverse logic of blood-soaked instrument panels; seat-belts smeared with excrement, sun-visors lined with brain tissue. For Vaughan, each crashed car set off a tremor of excitements in the complex geometries of a dented fender, in the unexpected variations of crushed radiator grilles, in the grotesque overhang of an instrument panel forced on to a driver’s crotch as if in some some calibrated act of machine fellation.” — J.G. Ballard, Crash


“Sooner or later, all games become serious.” — J.G. Ballard, Super-Cannes


Illustration for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition by Phoebe Gloeckner, RE/Search edition, 1990
“Science is the ultimate pornography, analytic activity whose main aim is to isolate objects or events from their contexts in time and space.”
— J.G. Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition
Also (+)

Illustration for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition by Phoebe GloecknerRE/Search edition, 1990

Science is the ultimate pornography, analytic activity whose main aim is to isolate objects or events from their contexts in time and space.

— J.G. Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition

Also (+)




“Her mutilation and death became a coronation of her image at the hands of a colliding technology, a celebration of her individual limbs and facial planes, gestures and skin tones. Each of the spectators at the accident site would carry away an image of the violent transformation of this woman, of the complex of wounds that fused together her own sexuality and the hard technology of the automobile. Each of them would join his own imagination, the tender membranes of his mucous surfaces, his grooves of erectile tissue, to the wounds of this minor actresss through the medium of his own motorcar, touching them as he drove in a medley of stylized postures. Each would place his lips on those bleeding apertures, lay his own nasal septum against the lesions of her left hand, press his eyelids against the exposed tendon of her forefinger, the dorsal surface of his erect penis against the ruptured lateral walls of her vagina. The automobile crash had made possible the final and longed-for union of the actress and the members of her audience.” — J.G. Ballard, Crash


“Technology is never grasped except in the (automobile) accident, that is to say in the violence done to technology itself and in the violence done to the body. It is the same: any shock, any blow, any impact, all the metallurgy of the accident can be read in the semiurgy of the body - neither an anatomy nor a physiology, but a semiurgy of contusions, scars, mutilations, wounds that are so many new sexual organs opened on the body. In this way, gathering the body as labor in the order of production is opposed to the dispersion of the body as anagram in the order of mutilation. Goodbye “erogeneous zones”: everything becomes a hole to offer itself to the discharge reflex. But above all (as in primitive initiation tortures, which are not ours), the whole body becomes a sign to offer itself to the exchange of bodily signs. Body and technology diffracting their bewildered signs through each other. Carnal abstraction and design.” —  Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulations - XII. Crash, translated by Sheila Faria Glaser


“Each mark, each trace, each scar left on the body is like an artificial invagination, like the scarifications of savages, which are always a vehement response to the absence of the body. Only the wounded body exists symbolically - for itself and for others - “sexual desire” is never anything but the possiblity bodies have of combining and exchanging their signs. Now, the few natural orifices to which one usually attaches sex and sexual activities are nothing next to all the possible wounds, all the artificial orifices (but why “artificial”?), all the breaches through which the body is reversibilized and, like certain topological spaces, no longer knows either interior nor exterior. Sex as we know it is nothing but a minute and specialized definition of all the symbolic and sacrificial practices to which a body can open itself, no longer through nature, but through artifice, through the simulacrum, through the accident. Sex is nothing but this rarefaction of a drive called desire on previously prepared zones. It is largely overtaken by the fan of symbolic wounds, which is in some sense the ana-grammatization of sex on the whole length of the body - but now precisely, it is no longer sex, it is something else, sex, itself, is nothing but the inscription of a privileged signifier and some secondary marks - nothing next to the exchange of all the signs and wounds of which the body is capable. The savages knew how to use the whole body to this end, in tattooing, torture, initiation - sexuality was only one of the possible metaphors of symbolic exchange, neither the most significant, nor the most prestigious, as it has become for us in its obsessional and realistic reference, thanks to its organic and functional character (including in orgasm).” — Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulations - XII. Crash, translated by Sheila Faria Glaser


Illustration by Phoebe Gloeckner for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition (RE/Search edition, 1990)

Illustration by Phoebe Gloeckner for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition (RE/Search edition, 1990)




Illustration by Phoebe Gloeckner for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition (RE/Search edition, 1990)

Illustration by Phoebe Gloeckner for J.G. Ballard’s The Atrocity Exhibition (RE/Search edition, 1990)




“During the hour they waited for her son to fall asleep her hands never left Laing. But even before they sat down together on her bed Laing knew that, almost as an illustration of the paradoxical logicof the high-rise, their relationship would end rather than begin with this first sexual act. In a real sense this would separate them from each other rather than bring them together. By the same paradox, the affection and concern he felt for her as they lay across her small bed seemed callous rather than tender, precisely because these emotions were unconnected with the realities of the world around them. The tokens that they should exchange, which would make their real care for each other, were made of far more uncertain materials, the erotic and perverse.” — 

J.G. Ballard, High-Rise.

(via batarde)




batarde, flyshiraz:

1. David Cronenberg’s Videodrome (1983) from 2-3-2
2. “Nothing is real until you put it in the VCR.” J.G. Ballard, Seconds magazine, 1996 

batardeflyshiraz:

1. David Cronenberg’s Videodrome (1983) from 2-3-2

2. “Nothing is real until you put it in the VCR.” J.G. Ballard, Seconds magazine, 1996 




“A car crash harnesses elements of eroticism, aggression, desire, speed, drama, kinesthetic factors, the stylizing of motion, consumer goods, status — all these in one event. I myself see the car crash as a tremendous sexual event really: a liberation of human and machine libido (if there is such a thing).” — J.G. Ballard - Interview in Penthouse, September 1970


“trying to exhaust himself, vaughan devised an endless almanac of terrifying wounds and insane collisions: the lungs of elderly men punctured by door-handles; the chests of young women impaled on steering-columns; the cheek of handsome youths torn on the chromium latches of quarter-lights. to vaughan, these wounds formed the key to a new sexuality, born from a perverse technology. the images of these wounds hung in the gallery of his mind, like exhibits in the museum of a slaughterhouse.” — 

J.G. Ballard, Crash (1973)

(via nosexhypnobate)




“Fiction is a branch of neurology: the scenarios of nerve and blood vessels are the written mythologies of memory and desire.” — J.G. Ballard - Ambit magazine, 1967