oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Orson Welles in publicity still for The Lady From Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles)
 
Q. What was the Hollywood reaction generally to [The Lady From Shanghai]?
Welles: Friends avoided me. Whenever it was mentioned, people would clear their throats and change the subject very quickly out of consideration for my feelings. I only found out that it was considered a good picture when I got to Europe. The first nice thing I ever heard about it from an American was from Truman Capote. One night in Sicily, he quoted whole pages of dialogue word for word.
Q. I guess that’s called being ahead of your time.
Welles: It’s called being in trouble.
-excerpted from This Is Orson Welles

oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Orson Welles in publicity still for The Lady From Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles)

Q. What was the Hollywood reaction generally to [The Lady From Shanghai]?

Welles: Friends avoided me. Whenever it was mentioned, people would clear their throats and change the subject very quickly out of consideration for my feelings. I only found out that it was considered a good picture when I got to Europe. The first nice thing I ever heard about it from an American was from Truman Capote. One night in Sicily, he quoted whole pages of dialogue word for word.

Q. I guess that’s called being ahead of your time.

Welles: It’s called being in trouble.

-excerpted from This Is Orson Welles




Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)




Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947) (Also)
Via Moon in the Gutter

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947) (Also)

Via Moon in the Gutter




Japanese poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

Japanese poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)




The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(More here and over at unbearablevision)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(More here and over at unbearablevision)




Original Polish poster for The Big Sleep (Michael Winner, 1978), designed by Marek Ploza-Dolinski, 1979

Original Polish poster for The Big Sleep (Michael Winner, 1978), designed by Marek Ploza-Dolinski, 1979




batarde, wehadfacesthen:

Gaby Rodgers, Kiss Me Deadly (1955)

(More stills over at unbearablevision)

batarde, wehadfacesthen:

Gaby Rodgers, Kiss Me Deadly (1955)

(More stills over at unbearablevision)




Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in opening credits to The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946)
(kristamasklousch)

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in opening credits to The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946)

(kristamasklousch)




oldhollywood:

Gene Tierney in Laura (1944, dir. Otto Preminger)
That was Laura. But she’s only a dream.

oldhollywood:

Gene Tierney in Laura (1944, dir. Otto Preminger)

That was Laura. But she’s only a dream.




Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
Via bswise

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

Via bswise




oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Everett Sloane in The Lady from Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles) (scene here)
“You’d be foolish to fire that gun. With these mirrors, it’s  difficult to tell - you are aiming at me, aren’t you? I’m aiming at you,  lover. Of course, killing you is killing myself. It’s the same thing.  But you know, I’m pretty tired of both of us.”

(More here)
I adore this film with every hardboiled chain-smoking double-crossing fibre of my noir-cuddling being.
See also: Why this sequence in Manhattan Murder Mystery always manages to reconcile my Woody Allen ambivalence (at least temporarily, and preferably coupled incongruously with the Gene-Wilder-shags-an-Armenian-sheep segement in Everything You’ve Always Know About Sex (But Were Afraid To Ask) ).

oldhollywood:

Rita Hayworth & Everett Sloane in The Lady from Shanghai (1947, dir. Orson Welles) (scene here)

“You’d be foolish to fire that gun. With these mirrors, it’s difficult to tell - you are aiming at me, aren’t you? I’m aiming at you, lover. Of course, killing you is killing myself. It’s the same thing. But you know, I’m pretty tired of both of us.”

(More here)

I adore this film with every hardboiled chain-smoking double-crossing fibre of my noir-cuddling being.

See also: Why this sequence in Manhattan Murder Mystery always manages to reconcile my Woody Allen ambivalence (at least temporarily, and preferably coupled incongruously with the Gene-Wilder-shags-an-Armenian-sheep segement in Everything You’ve Always Know About Sex (But Were Afraid To Ask) ).




The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via Flickering Too Long)
(See also)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via Flickering Too Long)

(See also)




The Lady From Shanghai (Orson  Welles, 1947)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)