I am a victim of tactilism. I have too many erogenous zones for one body. Sometimes I feel that I can’t even fit into it.

[…]

I am a hand with six fingers with webs in between. Instead of fingernails I have petite, sharp, sweet-toothed little tongues with which I lick the world.

— Jan Švankmajer - Excerpt from the diary he kept during the pre-production phase of Otesánek (Little Otík), dated 5 March 1999


Stills from Film Stenopeico by Paolo Gioli, 1974-1989

"This film, as the Vertovian title indicates, was made without a movie camera, more precisely with a device custom made to restore to images freedom from optics and mechanics. The act of substituting my device for a traditional movie camera is part of a project I have continued from that moment on towards weaning myself from a consumer technology, a toxin to pure creativity. This strange movie camera is a simple hollow metal tube, one centimeter thick, two centimeters wide, and a little more than a meter long. At the ends, two reels hold 16mm film. Film is pulled through manually causing alternations of time and space. The images enter simultaneously through 150 holes distributed along one side in proximity to each frame, that come to make up 150 tiny pinhole camera obscuras, also called stenopeic from the Greek stenos = narrow and from the stem op- from orào = to see. These tiny holes, when placed, for example, in front of a standing human figure, can explore it in its verticality but without any movement, which is appropriate since each hole will take in a single point, the detail in front of which the hole lies. One of the most obvious results will be to find oneself confronted precisely with a movement of the camera that never happened; somewhat magical pneumatic flutterings running longitudinally and transversally along a face and body reconstructed through 150 image points.”




Hans Richter on the set of Dreams That Money Can Buy (with the mannequin from The Girl with the Prefabricated Heart), 1946 
Photograph by Arnold Eagle

Hans Richter on the set of Dreams That Money Can Buy (with the mannequin from The Girl with the Prefabricated Heart), 1946 

Photograph by Arnold Eagle




199714424, performance-sofa:

claudia casarino —  sin titulo, 1998

performance-sofa:

claudia casarino —  sin titulo, 1998




Bed by Johan Grimonprez, 2009
Photograph by Kristien Daem

Bed by Johan Grimonprez, 2009

Photograph by Kristien Daem




Actress Kim Novak playing with some Siamese cats that were used in one of her movies, “Bell, Book and Candle.”
Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1958 



thedoppelganger, gallowhill:

Tunga, Xifópagas Capilares, 1984

thedoppelgangergallowhill:

Tunga, Xifópagas Capilares, 1984




Still from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974
Also

Still from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974

Also




minamata, gallowhill:

Ewa Partum - Tautological Cinema, 1973

minamatagallowhill:

Ewa Partum - Tautological Cinema, 1973




Stills from Tautological Cinema by Ewa Partum, 1973-1974

Watch here

Also

Tautological Cinema is a series of short films made in the paradigm of structural cinema – the movement of the late 1960s which focused on the examination of material factors of a film. Looking into a film as a medium Ewa Patrum concentrates on the notion of automatisation of a film message and the structure of its language. “It’s not dealing with aesthetics” claims the author. “It’s rather a new sort of philosophical practice that operates in the area in which the relation between the film image and the camerawork covers the whole interest in the film itself”. In artistic practice, such ideas can, for instance, take a form of an analysis of how film tape makes its way through a projector, as in the film 10 Metres of Film Tape. A work which stands out is Film by Ewa, which examines different ways of artistic communication and states that the indirect passing of ideas is not possible. “Covering, in turn, her mouth, eyes, ears (meant to manifest that an idea within an artist is not transferable) Ewa Patrum formulates an opinion which is to show the alienation of an author who, creating the art of meaning, cannot fully express the intentional idea. Once it gets materialized against an art medium or gets into the area of someone else’s experience it is distorted and distanced from the original meaning” argues Łukasz Ronduda.




Japanese poster for Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997)
(via thedoppelganger)

Japanese poster for Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997)

(via thedoppelganger)




Stills from Fiat 125p by Zygmunt Rytka, 1975




From Sean Young's collection of polaroids taken during the production of Blade Runner 




“I wouldn’t know what to do with [color]. Color to me is too real. It’s limiting. The more you throw black into a color, the more dreamy it gets… Black has depth. It’s like a little egress; you can go into it, and because it keeps on continuing to be dark, the mind kicks in, and a lot of things that are going on in there become manifest. And you start seeing what you’re afraid of. You start seeing what you love, and it becomes like a dream.” — 

David Lynch, Lynch on Lynch

(via frenchtwist)




Femi Benussi and Rita Calderoni in Questa libertà di avere… le ali bagnate (Alessandro Santini, 1971)
From L’alphabet des Lesbiennes, special edition of Playfilm, undated (early 1970s)
Via Au carrefour étrange

Femi Benussi and Rita Calderoni in Questa libertà di avere… le ali bagnate (Alessandro Santini, 1971)

From L’alphabet des Lesbiennes, special edition of Playfilm, undated (early 1970s)

Via Au carrefour étrange