“Who, surprised and horrified by the fantastic tumult of her drives (for she was made to believe that a well-adjusted normal woman has a … divine composure), hasn’t accused herself of being a monster? Who, feeling a funny desire stirring inside her (to sing, to write, to dare to speak, in short, to bring out something new), hasn’t thought she was sick?” — Hélène Cixous, The Laugh of the Medusa (in Signs 1:4, Summer 1976)


“Wouldn’t the worst be, isn’t the worst, in truth, that women aren’t castrated, that they have only to stop listening to the Sirens (for the Sirens were men) for history to change its meaning? You only have to look at the Medusa straight on to see her. And she’s not deadly. She’s beautiful and she’s laughing.” — Hélène Cixous, The Laugh of the Medusa (in Signs 1:4, Summer 1976)


“Censor the body and you censor breath and speech at the same time. Write yourself. Your body must be heard.” — Hélène Cixous, The Laugh of the Medusa (in Signs 1:4, Summer 1976)


“Cyborg writing must not be about the Fall, the imagination of a once-upon-a-time wholeness before language, before writing, before Man. Cyborg writing is about the power to survive, not on the basis of original innocence, but on the basis of seizing the tools to mark the world that marked them as other.” — Donna Haraway, A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century, 1985 


“Articulation is not a simple matter. Language is the effect of articulation, and so are bodies. The articulate are jointed animals; they are not smooth like the perfect spherical animals of Plato’s origin fantasy in the Timaeus. The articulate are cobbled together. It is the condition of being articulate. I rely on the articulate to breathe life into the artifactual cosmos of monsters that this essay inhabits. Nature may be speechless, without language, in the human sense; but nature is highly articulate. Discourse is only one process of articulation. An articulated world has an undecidable number of modes and sites where connections can be made.” — Donna Haraway, The Promises of Monsters: A Regenerative Politics for Inappropriate/d Others 


throwherinthewater, boystown:


The Cunt Cheerleaders - Students of the Feminist art program at California State University, Fresno (1970-71)

throwherinthewater, boystown:

The Cunt Cheerleaders - Students of the Feminist art program at California State University, Fresno (1970-71)




“As we think about worlds that might one day become thinkable, sayable, legible, the opening up of the foreclosed and the saying of the unspeakable become part of the very “offense” that must be committed in order to expand the domain of linguistic survival. The resignification of speech requires opening new contexts, speaking in ways that have never yet been legitimated, and hence producing legitimation in new and future forms.” — Judith Butler, Excitable Speech (1997)