Jenny Kapitän, Pension Dorian, Berlin by Helmut Newton for ZOOM n°62, May 1979
Also

Jenny Kapitän, Pension Dorian, Berlin by Helmut Newton for ZOOM n°62, May 1979

Also




Women in Corsets by Gerald Hochman, 1950s

Women in Corsets by Gerald Hochman, 1950s




From the series I am who I was by Karel Fonteyne

Carré, 1980 
The Bath, 1973

Also




Untitled (Nude) by Günter Blum, 1993

Untitled (Nude) by Günter Blum, 1993




Album art for Rose Au Cœur Violet by Die Form

Also




foxesinbreeches:

Hope Kroll, Physical Diagnosis, 2007
Also

foxesinbreeches:

Hope Kroll, Physical Diagnosis, 2007

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Olaf Martens, Halle, 1989 (from the series Blockschokolade)
Also

Olaf MartensHalle, 1989 (from the series Blockschokolade)

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Lisa Lyon by Robert Mapplethorpe, 1981

Lisa Lyon by Robert Mapplethorpe, 1981




 frenchtwist:
Frida Kahlo in a hospital bed, drawing her corset with help of a mirror by Juan Guzmán, 1951 Frida Kahlo wore plaster corsets for most of her life because her spine was too weak to support itself. She painted them, naturally, covering them with pasted scraps of fabric and drawings of tigers, monkeys, plumed birds, a blood-red hammer and sickle, and streetcars like the one whose handrail rammed through her body when she was eighteen years old. The corsets remain to this day in her famous blue house—their embedded mirrors reflecting back our gazes, their collages bringing the whole world into stricture. In one, an open circle has been carved into the plaster like a skylight near the heart. Frida’s corsets hardened around unspeakable longing. They still frame an invisible woman, still naked in her want, still calling to deaf men in the rain. I find them beautiful. She would have given anything, perhaps, to have a body that rendered them irrelevant. [ftp]

 frenchtwist:

Frida Kahlo in a hospital bed, drawing her corset with help of a mirror by Juan Guzmán, 1951

Frida Kahlo wore plaster corsets for most of her life because her spine was too weak to support itself. She painted them, naturally, covering them with pasted scraps of fabric and drawings of tigers, monkeys, plumed birds, a blood-red hammer and sickle, and streetcars like the one whose handrail rammed through her body when she was eighteen years old. The corsets remain to this day in her famous blue house—their embedded mirrors reflecting back our gazes, their collages bringing the whole world into stricture. In one, an open circle has been carved into the plaster like a skylight near the heart.

Frida’s corsets hardened around unspeakable longing. They still frame an invisible woman, still naked in her want, still calling to deaf men in the rain. I find them beautiful. She would have given anything, perhaps, to have a body that rendered them irrelevant. [ftp]



Collage by Karel Teige, 1938
Via calypsospots
Also

Collage by Karel Teige, 1938

Via calypsospots

Also




Peccavi - Paulina Otylie Surys for VISION magazine, China

Peccavi - Paulina Otylie Surys for VISION magazine, China




Cat’s Cradle by Janieta Eyre (from Incarnations series), 1995

Cat’s Cradle by Janieta Eyre (from Incarnations series), 1995




Carlo Mollino, 1960 
(From this series)
Via LE CLOWN LYRIQUE

Carlo Mollino, 1960 

(From this series)

Via LE CLOWN LYRIQUE




Paulina Otylie Surys for VISION magazine, China
(via hexavalentchromium, schwarz-wunderkammer)

Paulina Otylie Surys for VISION magazine, China

(via hexavalentchromiumschwarz-wunderkammer)