mizenscen, updownsmilefrown:

Anny Ondra in Blackmail, 1929

mizenscenupdownsmilefrown:

Anny Ondra in Blackmail, 1929




oldhollywood:


Alfred Hitchcock on the set of Frenzy (1972) (via)
Relatedly

oldhollywood:

Alfred Hitchcock on the set of Frenzy (1972) (via)

Relatedly




Alfred Hitchcock dummy floating in the River Thames for Frenzy trailer, 1972
(via sutured-infection, DILKE)

Alfred Hitchcock dummy floating in the River Thames for Frenzy trailer, 1972

(via sutured-infectionDILKE)




unbearablevision, human-activities:

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

unbearablevision, human-activities:

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)




billyjane:

Still from Hitchcock’s Psycho,1960
via dolce vita

billyjane:

Still from Hitchcock’s Psycho,1960

via dolce vita




obscureandoffbeatcinema:

Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)

obscureandoffbeatcinema:

Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)




infinitetext:

Alfred Hitchcock, Spellbound, 1945.

infinitetext:

Alfred Hitchcock, Spellbound, 1945.




Hitchcock’s Haunted House Party
Photograph by Yale Joel

Hitchcock’s Haunted House Party

Photograph by Yale Joel




beautyandterrordance:

German poster for Rear Window.

beautyandterrordance:

German poster for Rear Window.




frenchtwist:
Stroboscopic multiple exposure of Alfred Hitchcock teaching Teresa Wright how to struggle during filming of Shadow of a Doubt, 1942. Photo by Gjon Mili

frenchtwist:

Stroboscopic multiple exposure of Alfred Hitchcock teaching Teresa Wright how to struggle during filming of Shadow of a Doubt, 1942.
Photo by Gjon Mili



oldhollywood:

Judith Anderson in Rebecca (1940, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

oldhollywood:

Judith Anderson in Rebecca (1940, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)




oldhollywood:

Bernard Herrmann - Main Titles (via Sisters: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

“I launched into an eager ten minute explanation of why I didn’t want any title music…After I finished, Herrmann exploded.

‘No title music? Nothing horrible happens in your picture for the first half hour. You need something to scare them right away. The way you do it, they’ll walk out.’

‘But, in Psycho the murder doesn’t happen until 40…’

‘You are not Hitchcock! He can make his movies as slow as he wants in the beginning! And do you know why?’

I shook my head.

‘Because he is Hitchcock and they will wait! They know something terrible is going to happen and they’ll wait until it does. They’ll watch your movie for ten minutes and then they’ll go home to their television.’

Herrmann was brutal, and, of course, right.”

-Brian De Palma, quoted in A Heart at Fire’s Center: The Life and Music of Bernard Herrmann 




oldhollywood:

Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

oldhollywood:

Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)




oldhollywood:

Jimmy Stewart in Vertigo’s nightmare sequence (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

oldhollywood:

Jimmy Stewart in Vertigo’s nightmare sequence (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)