les-sources-du-nil, artspotting:


Charles Plumier, 1705, Traité des fougères de l’Amérique,  0281, Université de Strasbourg

les-sources-du-nilartspotting:

Charles Plumier, 1705, Traité des fougères de l’Amérique, 0281, Université de Strasbourg




foxesinbreeches:

Pierre Jacquet-Droz, Young Writer, 1770
From K.G. Pontus Hultén’s The Machine as Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age, Moma, 1968
Via the art of memory

foxesinbreeches:

Pierre Jacquet-Droz, Young Writer, 1770

From K.G. Pontus Hultén’s The Machine as Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age, Moma, 1968

Via the art of memory




A Nun Surprising a Monk Kissing a Nun in a Church Interior by Richard Cosway, 1785-1800
Also

A Nun Surprising a Monk Kissing a Nun in a Church Interior by Richard Cosway, 1785-1800

Also




Anatomy of a Woman’s Spine by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty, 1746

Anatomy of a Woman’s Spine by Jacques Fabien Gautier d’Agoty, 1746




Anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini and workshop, 1782 (from the Getty Villa’s Color of Life exhibition)
Photograph by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola,” Florence, Italy

Anatomical Venuses are life-sized wax anatomical models of idealized women, extremely realistic in appearance and often adorned with real hair and ornamental jewelry. These figures consist of removable parts that can be “dissected” to demonstrate anatomy— a breast plate is lifted to reveal the inner workings of the mysterious female body, often with a fetus to be found nestling in the womb. […] This was a way to share anatomical discovery with a larger audience without the need for an actual human dissection.Anatomical Venuses are probably the most historically popular form of anatomical models; in the 19th-Century, they were the centerpiece of museums and itinerant shows of all kinds, and possessed great power to draw crowds. The 18th-Century Florentine Venuses are the best remembered today, in no small part due to Taschen’s Encyclopaedia Anatomica, and are considered, by some, to be the finest examples of Anatomical Venuses known to exist.

Via Morbid Anatomy
Also

Anatomical Venus by Clemente Susini and workshop, 1782 (from the Getty Villa’s Color of Life exhibition)

Photograph by Saulo Bambi, Museo di Storia Naturale “La Specola,” Florence, Italy

Anatomical Venuses are life-sized wax anatomical models of idealized women, extremely realistic in appearance and often adorned with real hair and ornamental jewelry. These figures consist of removable parts that can be “dissected” to demonstrate anatomy— a breast plate is lifted to reveal the inner workings of the mysterious female body, often with a fetus to be found nestling in the womb. […] This was a way to share anatomical discovery with a larger audience without the need for an actual human dissection.

Anatomical Venuses are probably the most historically popular form of anatomical models; in the 19th-Century, they were the centerpiece of museums and itinerant shows of all kinds, and possessed great power to draw crowds. The 18th-Century Florentine Venuses are the best remembered today, in no small part due to Taschen’s Encyclopaedia Anatomica, and are considered, by some, to be the finest examples of Anatomical Venuses known to exist.

Via Morbid Anatomy

Also




rrosehobart, lindahall:

Angora cat in Georges Buffon’s Histoire naturelle, 1756.

rrosehobartlindahall:

Angora cat in Georges Buffon’s Histoire naturelle, 1756.




kirgiakoslaveneredissepolta:

Martin van Meytens - “Kneeling Nun”, c. 1731

the work has a recto and a verso side.




Anatomical Venus - La Specola Model, 18th century
From Opening Up a Few Corpses, 1795-1995 by John Bender of Stanford University
Via astropop

Anatomical Venus - La Specola Model, 18th century

From Opening Up a Few Corpses, 1795-1995 by John Bender of Stanford University

Via astropop




Medici Venus (anatomical wax model), 18th century

Medici Venus (anatomical wax model), 18th century




frenchtwist:
A Sure and Convenient Machine for Drawing Silhouettes by Thomas Holloway, 1792 From Johann Caspar Lavater, Essays on Physiognomy: Designed to Promote the Knowledge and the Love of Mankind

frenchtwist:

A Sure and Convenient Machine for Drawing Silhouettes by Thomas Holloway, 1792

From Johann Caspar Lavater, Essays on Physiognomy: Designed to Promote the Knowledge and the Love of Mankind



“Verily it must be that crime is an enchanting affair, for, in truth, from the flames by which it licks us is kindled the torch of our lust. Only crime is sufficient, it alone inflames us, and only crime can ravish pleasure through all degrees of our sensibility.” — 

Marquis de Sade, Justine, ou Les Infortunes de la Vertu, 1791

(via fette)




kirgiakos:

collages digitales de la enciclopedia de DIDEROT & D´ALAMBERT (1751)
#E02

kirgiakos:

collages digitales de la enciclopedia de DIDEROT & D´ALAMBERT (1751)

#E02




kirgiakos:

collages digitales de la enciclopedia de DIDEROT & D´ALAMBERT (1751)
#E33

kirgiakos:

collages digitales de la enciclopedia de DIDEROT & D´ALAMBERT (1751)

#E33




rapeblossom:

thanks to artpluscraft: Gennady Spirin. Illustration from ‘The White Cat”, tale by Madame d’Aulnoy (1650/1-1705)

rapeblossom:

thanks to artpluscraft: Gennady Spirin. Illustration from ‘The White Cat”, tale by Madame d’Aulnoy (1650/1-1705)